Monday, July 6, 2015

ARC Review & #Giveaway ~ Caught Read-Handed (Read Em and Eat Mystery, Book 2) by Terrie Farley Moran #CozyMystery

Welcome to my review of Caught Read-Handed, Book 2 in the Read Em and Eat Mystery series by Terrie Farley Moran!



Caught Read-Handed
by Terrie Farley Moran



Series: Read Em and Eat Mystery (Book 2)
Mass Market Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Berkley (July 7, 2015)
ISBN-13: 978-0425270295
E-Book ASIN: B00Q5DLWXA



About Caught Read-Handed:

From the national bestselling author of Well Read, Then Dead comes the second mystery featuring Sassy Cabot and Bridgy Mayfield, who bring Fort Myers Beach, Florida, residents plenty of sinful treats and killer reads at their bookstore café, Read ’Em and Eat.

Happy to help her fellow bibliophiles, Sassy visits the local library with book donations for their annual fundraising sale. Unfortunately, the welcoming readers’ haven is in turmoil as an argument erupts between an ornery patron and new staff member, Tanya Lipscombe—also known as “Tanya Trouble.” She may lack people skills, but everyone is shocked when she’s later found murdered in her own hot tub.

The man last seen arguing with Tanya is soon arrested. But Alan Mersky, a veteran with PTSD, happens to be the brother of Sassy’s former boss—and he’s no murderer. Now it’s up to Sassy and Bridgy to clear Alan’s name and make sure the real killer gets booked.

Includes a recipe for Miss Marple scones!

My Review:

My review of Well Read, Then Dead, Book 1 in the series can be found here:

Sassy and Bridgy are back! This time Sassy is hip deep in a murder mystery that has her welcoming her former boss and his family to Florida. When Sassy overhears a shouting match between a new library volunteer, socialite Tanya Lipscome, and a man that bears a striking resemblance to the boss she left back on the east coast, Sassy knows she has to make the call. George acknowledges that he has a brother with PTSD that manages to disappear from time-to-time. When the police department arrest George's brother, Alan, on a murder charge - his argument with Tanya at the library has the PD focusing on him as murderer numero uno when Tanya winds up dead - Sassy has no other option but to get George to Fort Myers Beach pronto.

Sometimes, it really is a small world that we all live in!!

I'm a huge fan of this cozy mystery series. Food + Books = Completeness.

Sassy and Bridgy are both very likable and interesting characters. Each has their own quirks and ways about them but they complement one another. Of course, Sassy's involvement in the search for the killer is noticed by local law enforcement officers Ryan Mantoni and Frank Anthony. As the mystery progresses and her involvement escalates, so does the frustration of Ryan and Frank. Speaking of Frank...I was really hoping for a bit of Frank and Sassy flirting and well, that part sort of fell flat. There wasn't really even any childish teasing between them to even hint that they liked each other, so maybe Sassy will be moving in a different direction in that regards.

There are several themes woven into this novel. Some are clearly not about the murder, such as the snake that has decided that Fort Myers Beach is a great vacation spot; lots of land, water, and local cuisine in the form of outdoor pets. Others could definitely pertain to the murder involving neighbors, stepchildren, husbands, and veterans with PTSD. The set up and execution (pun intended) of this murder mystery is done well. Red herrings are tossed about like the protest signs Aunt Ophie and her crew are using to support the local snake on vacation.

Suspects abound in this first book of the new series by Terrie Farley Moran and include, but aren't limited to long time residents, newcomers, tourists, family members, treasure hunters, and corporations. The back story and set up included for this novel is well written - the reader is provided all the back story needed to understand the who's and why's without being so overly inundated with useless information that you forget what's important.

Overall, I was pretty satisfied with Caught Read-Handed and found it to be a smooth flowing, easy read. The novel is engaging and will pull the reader in right from the beginning. There aren't any slow areas and everything seems pretty consistent. I was unable to solidly identify the suspect until pretty close to the reveal, which in itself is fantastic. I'm extremely interested to see where the author goes next with Sassy & Bridgy. You never know what may happen in Fort Myers Beach, Florida.

ARC review copy courtesy of the publisher, at no cost, in exchange for an honest review.

My Rating:


Amazon Purchase Link:


Meet the Author:



Short-listed twice for The Best American Mystery Stories, Terrie Farley Moran is delighted to introduce mystery fans to the Read ’Em and Eat café and bookstore, which debuted with Well Read, Then Dead. The only thing Terrie enjoys more than wrangling mystery plots into submission is playing games and reading stories with any or all of her grandchildren.

Author Links:

Webpage: http://terriefarleymoran.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/terrie.moran.9

Blog: www.womenofmystery.net

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/23186092-terrie-moran

Purchase Links:

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Caught-Read-Handed-Read-Eat-Mystery/dp/0425270297/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/caught-read-handed-terrie-farley-moran/1120824498?ean=9780425270295

Enter the Giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sunday, July 5, 2015

#99Cents ~ Feast of Fates Four Feasts Till Darkness, Book One, by Christian A. Brown

Today is the final day to grab an ecopy of Feast of Fates by Christian A. Brown for only $.99 from Amazon.

Feast of Fates (Four Feasts Till Darkness Book 1)

"Love is what binds us in brotherhood, blinds us from hate, and makes us soar with desire.”


Morigan lives a quiet life as the handmaiden to a fatherly old sorcerer named Thackery. But when she crosses paths with Caenith, a not wholly mortal man, her world changes forever. Their meeting sparks long buried magical powers deep within Morigan. As she attempts to understand her newfound abilities, unbidden visions begin to plague her--visions that show a devastating madness descending on one of the Immortal Kings who rules the land.

With Morigan growing more powerful each day, the leaders of the realm soon realize that this young woman could hold the key to their destruction. Suddenly, Morigan finds herself beset by enemies, and she must master her mysterious gifts if she is to survive.


Feast of Fates
Four Feasts Till Darkness, Book One
Christian A. Brown

Genre: Fantasy Romance

Date of Publication: September 9, 2014

ISBN: 978-1495907586
Number of pages: 540

Word Count: 212K

Watch the Book Trailer: http://youtu.be/8E_RVXgpqB8

Grab your ecopy for only $.99 !!


Meet the Author:


Christian A. Brown has written creatively since the age of six. After spending most of his career in the health and fitness industry, Brown quit his job to care for his mother when she was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma in 2010.

Having dabbled with the novel that would eventually become Feast of Fates for over a decade, Brown was finally able to finish the project. His mother, who was able to read a beginning version of the novel before she passed away, has since imbued the story with deeper sentiments of loss, love, and meaning. He is proud to now share the finished product with the world.






Saturday, July 4, 2015

Review: To Hell and Back (The World Around Us Series) by Beth Ann Masarik #UrbanFantasy #Paranormal Romance


To Hell and Back

by Beth Ann Masarik

Genre: Urban Fantasy, Paranormal Romance


Take a journey to Hell with Elise Stevenson as she braves meeting Hades and his companions in this compilation. To Hell and Back consists of the short stories Murderous Regrets, Hell Bound and Hell’s Captive. In these three stories, Elise is sent to Hell to uncover the secrets of the villains in The World Among Us. She dodges the worst of demons, and goes to the very depths of Hell just to interview Hades and the Prince of Darkness themselves among other monsters that appear in the series.

In the short story, Moon Spirit, however, we are brought back to earth, where we meet Raul Blackoak and his family. While Raul is out on patrol, he hears the cries of a damsel in distress. A battle begins between the werewolf and two demons, but before long, the night is saved by a surprise visitor. Raul and his new partner save the day, only for things to become more serious when they bring her back to Raul’s home. Will Raul be able to come to terms with the strange twist of events? 

My Reviews:

Moon Spirit:
Moon Spirit is a quick 20-ish page short story that is first up in the To Hell and Back collection.  Raoul, a werewolf, comes face-to-face with two vampires draining a female human.  Intent on saving her, Raoul winds up toss about like a ragdoll.  Surprisingly, an additional guest join the little party but who's side are he really on?  Raoul's or two vamps?

Barely escaping with either of their lives, Raoul and the female, named Kylie, head to his home with the surprise guest, in tow.  Here is were Kylie enters the story line.  Will Kylie accept the strange and unusual or will  Raoul's pack have to handle her the hard way?

The story is interesting and engaging and kept me reading to find out how the mystery person was.  I also was intrigued by how Kylie fit into the story line.  There wasn't as smooth of dialogue between characters as I would have liked.  Kylie's introduction into the paranormal world was to quick and she was way too accepting.  The overall length made the revelations seems rushed and choppy.
My Rating for Moon Spirit =

Murderous Regrets:
Elise Stevenson is a journalist tasked with interviewing a convicted murderer, Leon Greene.  Except, Leon isn't your usual suspect; he's a werewolf.  His victim?  Leon's best friend and leader of the magical world, Jason Aysel.  And in this short story, Leon explains what lead up to his attack on his best friend.

Murderous Regrets will give the reader a bit more insight into the author's creativity.  The main players are Hades, his son Damien, the moon goddess, Selene, and the god Gaia.  Beth Ann takes these characters and masterfully weaves a tale of jealousy, power, and deceit.

The second story in the To Hell and Back collection is very interesting and engaging.  I was pulled in from the beginning and found the story line to be new and different.  I enjoyed the writing style in this story and the dialogue between characters was smooth.  A quick jaunt into the mind of an assassin gives a clearer path into The World Among Us.
My Rating for Murderous Regrets= 

Hell Bound:
Elise Stevenson gets embroiled in the paranormal world just a tad more in Hell Bound.  Now that she's impressed her boss with her interviewing skills based on her time with Leon (in Murderous Regrets) he has a new mission for her.  It's time for a face-to-face interview with the devil himself, Hades.  So...off to Hell she goes, although she has no idea how to get there or if she'll be able to get back once she does.

The third story in the To Hell and Back collection, Hell Bound, finds our main character, Elise Stevenson, who is a human, with a ~ hopefully ~ two-way ticket to Hell.  Her interview with Hades isn't all wine and roses considering when Elise gets to Hell, her first encounter is with Hades' right-hand woman, DuVessa.  A rocky start to her trip ends with finally sitting down with Hades to find out that he wants to overthrow Gaia and take over the world.

Hell Bound is another fascinating additional to the author's short stories in The World Among Us series.   I was pulled in from the beginning and found the story line to be new and different.  I enjoyed the writing style in this story and the dialogue between characters was smooth. Quick and engaging, this story is filled with the explanations of a crazy demon and his equally nasty female side kick.  If they are able to wrestle power away from Gaia, we are all in big, big trouble.
My Rating for Hell Bound= 

Hell's Captive:
In the final story of the To Hell and Back collection of short stories in The World Among Us series, Elise now finds herself meeting with Damien, the son of Hades.  As the key player in the upcoming war between good and evil, interviewing Damien is a must.  He is after all, the epicenter of the the events that have unfolded and are continuing to unfold.

What Elise discovers is an epic love story turned tragic.  Damien's love for a moon goddess was used against him by the one person that he should have been able to trust.  His punishment was handed down by Gaia, which he is fulfilling even now.  The best interview she's conducted to-date is going to be the hardest one for her to write up.

Hell's Captive completes the collection of short stories in To Hell and Back quite nicely.   I was pulled in from the beginning and found the story line to be new and different.  I enjoyed the writing style in this story and the dialogue between characters was smooth.
My Rating of Hell's Captive= 

Collectively, these 4 stories make up the novella, To Hell and Back.

Review copy of To Hell and Back provided at no cost in exchange for an honest review.

My Rating of To Hell and Back:


Amazon Link for To Hell and Back:


Meet the Author:


Beth Ann Masarik was born on Long Island, NY in the year 1984 with an over-active imagination. She used to love playing make-believe games, and now loves creating her own fantasy worlds. Masarik has been writing since she was 15 years old, and had her first newspaper article published in her high school newspaper in her sophomore year. She has taken several creative writing classes, and started writing her very first novel in college, and is currently searching for the right literary agent. Aside from writing novels, Masarik enjoys bowling, gaming, and role playing online. She enjoys reading fantasy novels written by Richelle Mead, L.J. Smith, and J.K. Rowling, and looks to them for role models.

Socialize with Beth Ann:


@theworldamongus

@literarylunes






Friday, July 3, 2015

Blog Tour & #Excerpt ~ Drop Dead Punk (Coleridge Taylor #Mystery series, Book 2) by Rich Zahradnik

Welcome to the July 2015 Blog Tour for Rich Zahradnik's novel ~ Drop Dead Punk


About the Book:

cover
Coleridge Taylor is searching for his next scoop on the police beat. The Messenger-Telegram reporter has a lot to choose from on the crime-ridden streets of New York City in 1975. One story outside his beat is grabbing all the front page glory: New York teeters on the brink of bankruptcy, and President Ford just told the city, as the Daily News so aptly puts it, "Drop Dead." Taylor's situation is nearly as desperate. His home is a borrowed dry-docked houseboat, his newspaper may also be on the way out, and his drunk father keeps getting arrested.
A source sends Taylor down to Alphabet City, hang-out of the punks who gravitate to the rock club CBGB. There he finds the bloody fallout from a mugging. Two dead bodies: a punk named Johnny Mort and a cop named Robert Dodd. Each looks too messed up to have killed the other. Taylor starts asking around. The punk was a good kid, the peace-loving guardian angel of the neighborhood's stray dogs. What led him to mug a woman at gunpoint? And why is Officer Samantha Callahan being accused of leaving her partner to die, even though she insists the police radio misled her? It's hard enough being a female in the NYPD only five years after women were assigned to patrol. Now the department wants to throw her to the wolves. That's not going to happen, not if Taylor can help it. As he falls for Samantha--a beautiful, dedicated second-generation cop--he realizes he's too close to his story. Officer Callahan is a target, and Taylor's standing between her and some mighty big guns.
Drop Dead Punk is book 2 in the Coleridge Taylor Mystery series.

Book Details:

Genre: Mystery
Series: Book 2 in the Coleridge Taylor Mystery series.
Published by: Camel Press,
Publication Date: ~ Aug. 15, 2015
Number of Pages: 254
ISBN: 978-1603812092
Purchase Links: Amazon Barnes & Noble Goodreads

Read an excerpt:

NOTE: FROM UNCORRECTED PROOF (ARC):
The great headlines of other newspapers were always to be despised. Not today.
The three ancient copy editors were on their feet, with Copydesk Chief Milt Corman in the middle. Taylor stopped his walk through the newsroom to find out why. If someone had made a mistake, it must be a colossal one to get those fat asses out of their seats. He looked over Corman’s shoulder. The copy chief held the Daily News. It was that day’s edition, Oct. 30, 1975. The 144-point front-page headline screamed up from the page.

FORD TO CITY:

DROP DEAD


Corman rattled the paper violently. “That’s a work of art. Tells the whole story in five words. He gave the city the finger yesterday.”
Jack Miller, one of the other old farts, moved back to his seat. You could only expect him to stand for so long. He settled into his chair for another day of slashing copy. “What do you expect from our unelected president? Veepee to Nixon. Goddamned pardoned Robert E. Lee two months ago.”
“Didn’t pardon him. Gave him back his citizenship.”
“Same thing. The barbarians are running the country and now they’re at our gates. We’re the biggest, most important city on the planet, and he’s going to leave us hanging to get himself actually elected to the job.”
Corman flipped open the paper to the Ford speech story across pages four and five. “Just listen to this bullshit. ‘I am prepared to veto any bill that has as its purpose a Federal bailout of New York City to prevent a default.’ He blathers on about using the uniform bankruptcy laws. On and on and on. How do you police the streets and pick up garbage under the uniform bankruptcy laws? A Federal judge trying to run the whole damn city? Chaos.”
“Ford’s from Grand Rapids.” Miller shook his big round head. “He doesn’t know from anything about this place. He’s talking to all the flatlanders—a nation that hates us.”
“Will you listen to this at the end? ‘If we go on spending more than we have, providing more benefits and more services than we can pay for, then a day of reckoning will come to Washington and the whole country just as it has to New York City. When that day of reckoning comes, who will bail out the United States of America?’ He’ll kill this city to keep his job.” Corman looked from the paper to Taylor. “You’re the crime reporter. Why don’t you go after this? Write the story about the man who murdered New York.”
Taylor laughed. “You can’t kill New York.”
“Rome fell.”
“Rome wasn’t New York. You know this is the same political bullshit. Made up numbers and budget magic and threats from Washington. New York will still be here long after. It’s a great headline, though. You guys should try writing ’em like that.”
He left the horseshoe copy desk before they could protest that wasn’t the style of the New York Messenger-Telegram. He knew all too well the three of them would kill to be headline writers at the Daily News. That paper wasn’t perpetually on the verge of failing like the MT.
Taylor gave New York’s financial crisis about thirty seconds more thought as he wound his way around the maze of the newsroom. To him, the crisis was background noise. The city had become a dark place since the Sixties decided to end early, round about 1968. Crime lurked in the darkness, and he covered crime. He was too busy with New York’s growth industry to pay attention to the mayor’s budget problems.
Heroin everywhere.
Corruption in the police department.
Buildings in the South Bronx torched by the block.
Those were the stories he went after, not failed bond sales and blabbering politicos. Problem was the damn financial story had pushed everything else off the MT’s front page. Taylor hadn’t had a decent story out there in three weeks. He needed the quick hit of a page one byline, needed it particularly bad this morning. The cops had called him at home last night. Not about a story this time. They’d arrested his father, reeling drunk in his underwear outside his apartment building. Taylor had been up until three a.m. dealing with that mess. A good story—a good story that actually got decent play—and a few beers after to celebrate. Now that would pick him up. For a day or two at least.
Make the calls. Someone’s got to have something. Now that Ford’s had his say, there must be room on page one.
He’d almost slipped past the city desk when Worth called out his name. Taylor tried to pretend he hadn’t heard and kept going, but Worth raised his high-pitched voice and just about yelled. Taylor turned and went back to the pristine maple-topped desk of City Editor Bradford J. Worth, Jr.
“I’ve got an assignment for you.”
That was always bad news. “Haven’t made my calls yet.”
“Doesn’t matter. Need you down at City Hall.”
Taylor brightened. Crime at City Hall. A murder? That would be big.
“What’s the story?” He sounded enthusiastic. He shouldn’t have.
“You’re to go to the pressroom and wait for announcements. Glockman called in sick.”
“C’mon, Worth. Not babysitting. You’ve got three other City Hall reporters.” Who’ve owned the front page for weeks.
“They’re all very busy pursuing the most important story in this city’s history. Your job is to sit at our desk in the pressroom and wait for the mayor to issue a statement on Ford’s speech. Or the deputy mayor. Or a sanitation worker. Or a cleaning lady. Anybody says anything, you phone it in. Rumor is they’re working on using city pension funds.”
Worth’s phone rang, and he picked up. “Yeah, I’m sending Taylor down. No, he’ll do for now.” He set the receiver lightly on its hook. “You’ve been down in the dumps since your friend Laura left us. Was it her going or the fact she got a job at the New York Times? Because you’ll never get there, not with the way you dodge the biggest stories.”
“Hey, you and I are both still here.”
Worth frowned. Ambition rose off the man like an odor as strong as the cologne he wore. He’d made city editor at thirty without ever working as a reporter. Everyone knew he wanted more, and to him, more meant the New York Times. He’d almost been as upset as Taylor when Laura Wheeler announced she had the gig, and Worth wasn’t the one in love with Laura. He had been sure he was leaving next.
“Both here, but I’m the one doing his job. Now get to City Hall.”
“You have to be able to find someone else.” Exasperation through grit teeth. “Crime is big for this paper.”
“I decide what’s big.” He picked up the phone, dialed an inside extension, and showed Taylor his back.
Sitting at City Hall waiting for a press release was the perfect way to ruin Taylor’s day, something the city editor liked doing so much it had become a bad habit.
Taylor arrived at his own desk to find the other police reporters gone, probably making their rounds.
The desk that had been Laura’s reminded him of her—of her dark brown eyes, her black hair, her beautiful face. She’d left an aching emptiness inside him. They’d lasted a month after she’d moved to the New York Times, and then she’d broken it off. She said she realized the only thing they had in common was the MT. She hadn’t been mean about it. And she wasn’t wrong. The paper had been their life during the day and their conversation at night. He wondered if it also had to do with his age, 34, and where he was—or wasn’t—in life. He pushed his hand through his short brown hair. He’d even found himself considering his thin, angular face, something he’d never done before. Was that it? Laura was beautiful. Taylor couldn’t think of a word for what he was.
He recently heard she’d started dating a guy on the foreign staff, Derek something. He wondered how old Derek was. Late twenties and optimistic, he guessed, unbowed by life. From a good family too, probably. It was always going to end. So why did it hurt like this?
Truth was Taylor had been living with emptiness for years before he met her. Over that time, he’d gotten used to it, let the job fill his life. Only, having her and losing her made him understand how much he disliked this lonely hole inside.
Really should leave right away.
The black phone in front of him was too much temptation. Worth couldn’t see Taylor from the city desk. He picked up the receiver, pushed the clear plastic button for an outside line, and dialed the number for Sidney Greene at 1 Police Plaza. Greene was perhaps the most discontented, dyspeptic minor civil servant Taylor had ever encountered. He leaked stories not to expose injustice or right a wrong, but to screw his bosses. He simply loved watching them deal with the chaos he created by tipping off Taylor.
“Anything up?”
“Oh, a real shit show. Officer down.”
Taylor flipped open a notebook. Even in the midst of this dark age of drugs, muggings, and homicides, a police officer murdered was still a big story. A page one story. “Where and when?”
“Avenue B and East Eighth, just in from Tompkins Square Park.”
“What happened?”
“That’s all I can do for you. They’re doing the headless chicken dance down here. You’ll be ahead of the others if you get to the scene quick. Not by much, though.”
Taylor left the newsroom for the Lower Eastside. He’d check for press releases at City Hall after visiting the scene of the cop’s murder. Worthless would have his head if he missed even one minor announcement. Screw it. Taylor couldn’t ignore a big story. A real story.
He hustled from the subway across the blocks to the crime scene. The day offered near perfect New York fall weather, with the air crisp and clear, tingling with energy. He unwrapped a stick of Teaberry gum and stuck it in his mouth. The temperature had dropped from yesterday’s high of 70 and would only make it into the mid-fifties today. Jacket weather—Taylor’s favorite. Not so hot he broke into a sweat on a good walk, and cool but not cold—he wasn’t fighting the brutal winds of winter that blasted down the avenues. Easy weather put New Yorkers at ease. He could sense it as he walked. More smiles. Sidewalk trees even showed off muted reds and gold. Taylor knew it was nothing like the color upstate but it would do.
Taylor’s press pass got him inside the cluster of patrol cars guarding the ambulance. A couple of fire engines had also rolled to the scene, which was a dilapidated brownstone with half its windows boarded, a missing door, and a huge hole in the roof. The place was a true Lower Eastside wreck in a neighborhood where hard luck meant you were doing pretty well for yourself.
Taylor climbed the cracked front steps. A “Condemned Building” sign was nailed to the open door. The first floor had few interior walls, only piles of rubble from when the roof had come down, bringing chunks of the next three floors with it. The smell of must mingled with the stink of garbage. Two uniformed and four plainclothes police stood around a uniformed body sprawled across a pile of plaster chunks and wood slats in the middle of what was once probably a living room. Off to the right in the front corner was a second body, guarded by no one.
Seeing an opportunity, Taylor moved closer to the body in the corner. The man, young and apparently startled by death, had taken one shot to the chest and one in the leg. Blood soaked a black T-shirt printed with big white letters Taylor couldn’t read unless he adjusted the man’s leather jacket, which was also covered in blood. The man’s heart must have pumped his life’s blood out in minutes. Faster maybe. His right hand was on his stomach and clutched a green leather purse with a gold chain strap. Taylor knew better than to touch anything. Instead, he leaned in and was met by the iron and musk odor of blood. The top of the man’s hand was tattooed with a spiral pattern, an eye at its center. The fingers were inked with the bones of a skeleton, like an X-ray of what lay beneath the dead man’s skin.
The face was young—twenties, probably early twenties— bony and pale, with a tattoo of a spider web that started below the shirt line and crept up his neck to his chin and right ear. His hair was short and spiky, in the punk style—as was his whole look. Many of them had recently moved into this neighborhood to be near the punk rock club CBGB and the other bars that were the heart of the punk rock scene. Many were squatters.
“Don’t touch nothin’.” A short chunky cop with a gold badge in his belt walked over.
“I’d never do that, Detective.” Taylor rose from his crouch.
“I’m very sorry about the loss of an officer.”
“Yeah, thanks. And who the fuck are you?”
“Taylor with the Messenger-Telegram.” Taylor tapped the laminated pass.
“The Empty, huh? Read it sometimes. At least you’re not the fucking Times. I hate those pricks.”
Five years since the New York Times interviewed Serpico and broke the story of massive corruption in the NYPD, and the paper was still on every cop’s shit list. At the time, Taylor had gone crazy trying to follow the Times’ scoops. He’d admired what the Times had done and hated being behind on such a big story. He didn’t need to tell the detective that, though. It was fine with him if the man liked the Messenger-Telegram. Taylor himself liked cops, the honest kind at least. When he’d started at the paper, police reporters were almost cops themselves. Or adjuncts, at least. They helped the police, publicizing successes, ignoring failures and drinking in the same places. Not anymore. Trust had been lost, and it wasn’t going to be won back anytime soon.
What happened?”
“This jamoke holds up a woman for her purse when she comes up from the subway at Astor Place. Officer Robert Dodd and his partner give chase. The mugger runs across St. Mark’s Place, through the park and into this hole. They exchange shots. Both are killed. At least that’s what we can figure so far.”
“Dodd’s partner?”
“Couldn’t keep up. Poor Dodd was stuck with a meter maid. When little Samantha Callahan gets here, they’re both dead. What’s the point of having broads patrolling if they can’t back you up?” Lights flashed across the detective’s jowly face. He looked out the glassless window at the car pulling up. “Assistant chief. I’ve got to make sense of this for him.”
Taylor jotted down the name on the detective’s plate, R. Trunk. He dug out a business card and handed it to the detective. “Anything more comes up, call me. We take care of cops at the MT.” Laying it on thick never hurt. “Dodd’s a hero. His story should be told right.”
“Yeah, we’ll see. Your paper may not be awful. Doesn’t mean I trust you. Now get out of here. We got work to do.”
Trunk turned as another plainclothesman walked up. “Still haven’t got the kid’s gun.”
Well, find the fucking thing. Assistant chief ’s going to be on us like stink on shit.”
That was odd. If Dodd took out the mugger, the man’s gun would be right here somewhere. It couldn’t have walked away on its own. Taylor put that detail in his notebook. Anything odd always went in the notebook. He walked a wide arc toward the door to get a quick view of the dead officer. Dodd was a complete mess. He had to have been shot in the face. Taylor couldn’t make out the nose, the eyes, anything in the gore and blood. That meant he had to have shot the mugger first.

Author Bio:

authorRich Zahradnik is the author of the Coleridge Taylor Mystery series from Camel Press. Last Words is the first novel in the series and was published Oct. 1, 2014. Drop Dead Punk will come out Aug. 15. He was a journalist for 30-plus years, working as a reporter and editor in all major news media, including online, newspaper, broadcast, magazine and wire services. He held editorial positions at CNN, Bloomberg News, Fox Business Network, AOL and The Hollywood Reporter, often writing news stories and analysis about the journalism business, broadcasting, film production, publishing and the online industry. In January 2012, he was one of 20 writers selected for the inaugural class of the Crime Fiction Academy, a first-of-its-kind program run by New Yorks Center for Fiction. He has been a media entrepreneur throughout his career. He was the founding executive producer of CNNfn.com, a leading financial news website and a Webby winner; managing editor of Netscape.com, and a partner in the soccer-news website company Goal Networks. Zahradnik also co-founded the weekly newspaper The Peekskill Herald at the age of 25, leading it to seven state press association awards in its first three years. Zahradnik was born in Poughkeepsie, New York, and received his B.A. in journalism and political science from George Washington University. He lives with his wife Sheri and son Patrick in Pelham, New York, where he writes fiction and teaches elementary school kids how to publish the online and print newspaper the Colonial Times.

Catch Up: 


author's website author's twitter author's facebook


Tour Participants:




 
 
 

Get More Great Reads at Partners In Crime Virtual Book Tours


#99Cents - July 3-5 Only ~ Feast of Fates Four Feasts Till Darkness, Book One, by Christian A. Brown

"Love is what binds us in brotherhood, blinds us from hate, and makes us soar with desire.”


Morigan lives a quiet life as the handmaiden to a fatherly old sorcerer named Thackery. But when she crosses paths with Caenith, a not wholly mortal man, her world changes forever. Their meeting sparks long buried magical powers deep within Morigan. As she attempts to understand her newfound abilities, unbidden visions begin to plague her--visions that show a devastating madness descending on one of the Immortal Kings who rules the land.

With Morigan growing more powerful each day, the leaders of the realm soon realize that this young woman could hold the key to their destruction. Suddenly, Morigan finds herself beset by enemies, and she must master her mysterious gifts if she is to survive.


Feast of Fates
Four Feasts Till Darkness, Book One
Christian A. Brown

Genre: Fantasy Romance

Date of Publication: September 9, 2014

ISBN: 978-1495907586
Number of pages: 540

Word Count: 212K

Watch the Book Trailer: http://youtu.be/8E_RVXgpqB8

Grab your ecopy for only $.99 !!


Meet the Author:


Christian A. Brown has written creatively since the age of six. After spending most of his career in the health and fitness industry, Brown quit his job to care for his mother when she was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma in 2010.

Having dabbled with the novel that would eventually become Feast of Fates for over a decade, Brown was finally able to finish the project. His mother, who was able to read a beginning version of the novel before she passed away, has since imbued the story with deeper sentiments of loss, love, and meaning. He is proud to now share the finished product with the world.